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In order to support our study of life sciences my fourth grade teammate and I would like to lead our students in the study embryology, the life cycle of chickens, through all steps of the life cycle. We would like for our students to observe and care for eggs in an incubator, as well as care for them during and after hatching. By incorporating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math with Language Arts, this unit of study will give our students a real-world, hands-on learning opportunity with life science.
Our first goal is to improve students' attitudes about math and science. This will be measured by surveys completed before the project begins and after the project is finished. We would like to see 25% of our students reflect a more positive attitude about math and science as reported in the final surveys.

Secondly, we want to increase students' level of engagement and participation in math and science lessons. Levels of engagement will be measured by teacher observation and anecdotal notes. Formal notes and observations will be completed before the project begins, during the project, and after the project is completed. We would like to see a 25% increase in on-task, engaged behavior in math and science lessons.

Finally, we want to see an improvement in math and science academic performance over the course of the year as measured by countywide Common Assessments administered three times per year. We would like to see a 25% increase in students meeting expectations in math and science by the end of the school year, as measured by the countywide Common Assessments for math and science.

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JCRFF-Don't Count Your Chickens Before They Hatch!

grant photo
School:
Fuguitt Elementary School 
Subject:
Science 
Teacher:
Erin Macking 
 
Lourdes Pickart 
Students Impacted:
46 
Grade:
Date:
February 7, 2014

Investor

Thank you to the following investor for funding this grant.

 

Jan Chase Rutz Fund within Community Foundation at Tampa Bay - $499.90

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Goal

In order to support our study of life sciences my fourth grade teammate and I would like to lead our students in the study embryology, the life cycle of chickens, through all steps of the life cycle. We would like for our students to observe and care for eggs in an incubator, as well as care for them during and after hatching. By incorporating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math with Language Arts, this unit of study will give our students a real-world, hands-on learning opportunity with life science.
Our first goal is to improve students' attitudes about math and science. This will be measured by surveys completed before the project begins and after the project is finished. We would like to see 25% of our students reflect a more positive attitude about math and science as reported in the final surveys.

Secondly, we want to increase students' level of engagement and participation in math and science lessons. Levels of engagement will be measured by teacher observation and anecdotal notes. Formal notes and observations will be completed before the project begins, during the project, and after the project is completed. We would like to see a 25% increase in on-task, engaged behavior in math and science lessons.

Finally, we want to see an improvement in math and science academic performance over the course of the year as measured by countywide Common Assessments administered three times per year. We would like to see a 25% increase in students meeting expectations in math and science by the end of the school year, as measured by the countywide Common Assessments for math and science.
 

 

What will be done with my students

The planned project activities are as follows:
1) Complete predictions and record data in regard to length of time needed to incubate the eggs.
2) Students will also participate in and record in their journals daily temperature, humidity, and egg-turning checks to be sure that the incubator is maintaining the necessary environment. They will also learn about the parts of the egg, the growing embryo, and the hatching process.
3) The students will have the opportunity to "candle" the incubating eggs, which means we will shine a bright light through the eggs to observe the developing embryo.
4) The students will be able to observe the chickens hatching over a period of several days.
5) Students will also help to prepare the "brooder cage" with sawdust, water, food, and a heat lamp to prepare the necessary environment for newly hatched chicks.
6) They will also be involved with caring for the live chickens after hatching.
7) Each child will have the opportunity to publish a �Bare Book� after researching the life cycles of chickens and other animals.
 

 

Benefits to my students

This project will benefit my students by enhancing my students' abilities to connect classroom learning with the outside world by giving them the opportunity to experience the full life cycle of a chicken. Many of my students have never been to a farm, so they have not had the chance to interact with farm animals, witness their life cycles, or make the real world connection to what they learn in the classroom. This will further support understanding of the cyclical nature of the chicken's life cycle, as well as give students an opportunity to apply their book learning to real world learning. They will also learn how the incubator recreates the delicate environment needed for incubating eggs. Due to the hands-on nature of this project, we believe that our students will be more actively engaged in learning as they are witnessing the chicken�s life cycle, first hand. They will also have the opportunity to publish a non-fiction �Bare Book� after their life-cycle studies. 

 

Describe the Students

Our students are eager to learn, thrive in kinesthetic learning activities, and love interacting with animals and insects. We feel that they will be thoroughly engaged in this project because of the real-world, high-interest nature of the project.
In August, 1% of our fourth graders met expectations in Science and 8% met grade level expectations in Math, according to the fourth grade Common Assessments. Students are assessed on the same expectations three times a year to track their growth in each subject. With approximately 65+% of our students qualifying for free/reduced lunch, their economic disadvantage exacerbates the achievement gap, especially in Math and Science. In regard to their learning abilities, we have five students diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder), which impedes their focus on learning. One of our students has learning disabilities, one has severe Diabetes, and two are diagnosed with Behavior Disorders. In addition, there are five students who have qualified for a Section 504 Plan which provides accommodations for struggling students to help support their learning goals.
 

 

Budget Narrative

We need to purchase an incubator that has the self-turning feature so that eggs can continue to incubate safely, even on the weekends when we are not at school. Through other funding sources, we have already purchased brooder cages. We also have Embryology curriculum. Each child will further research the life cycle of a chicken or other animal and publish a �Bare Book� about that life cycle. Therefore, we need to purchase a "Bare Book" for each student. 

 

Items

# Item Cost
1 Octagon 40 Eco Incubator, Item #C31833N $406.95
2 46 Bare Books $92.95
  Total: $499.90

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