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The goal is to give students a tangible tool to help them better understand difficult geometry concepts.

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Looking at Hands-On Learning From A Different ANGLE

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School:
Safety Harbor Elementary School 
Subject:
Mathematics 
Teacher:
Michelle Bardelli 
 
Wendy Stryker, Shannon Wilkins 
Students Impacted:
400 
Grade:
K-5 
Date:
July 31, 2018

Investor

Thank you to the following investor for funding this grant.

 

Raymond James - $658.35

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Impact to My Classroom

# of Students Impacted: 600

We were able to provide manipulatives to our K-5 gen-ed and ASD classrooms. Each classroom teacher received enough set to use in groups of three so many students could participate at once whole group or in small group.

The teachers were very excited to get a manipulative that supported the geometry standards. Staff had an opportunity to play with the Exploragons and discuss ways to use them in their classrooms.

Kindergarten teachers were able to use these in their classrooms as morning bins, a time where students can engage in problem-solving, building and fine-motor development. Students are able to create geometric shapes freely.  The teachers are setting the stage for the use of the manipulatives in the following grades.

First grade students created 2-dimensional shapes using the Exploragons. They are able to distinguish between defining attributes and non-defining attributes based on the shapes that they made. For example, a student that made a closed-shape was able to  identify that as a defining attribute, while the “yellow” shape is a non-defining attribute

Second graders took it up a notch by creating shapes with specific geometric attributes using the Exploragons. Students are expected to draw shapes with defining characteristics, so this gave them an opportunity to create the shape before drawing. Students created 4-sided shapes that had 4 equal sides, 3 sided shapes with 3 equals sides and so on.

Third- Fifth graders built upon their knowledge to create quadrilaterals using the Exploragons. One of the most difficult aspects of teaching and learning geometry is the heavy vocabulary attached to the attributes of geometric shapes. Giving students an opportunity to create a quadrilateral with 2 sets of parallel lines, or 2 right angles, increased their engagement, deepened their understanding and promoted critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

4th grade students could create a right, obtuse or acute angle and represent that in a 2 dimensional shape. They were able to manipulate the pieces and demonstrate their understanding of the different angles.

Students were able to create shapes and classify the shapes they made based on their attributes.

I think it will take some time to see the long-term affects of providing all grade level with these resources.  I do believe that each year that we use this resource, we will see a deeper conceptual understanding of geometry at our school.

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Original Grant Overview

Goal

The goal is to give students a tangible tool to help them better understand difficult geometry concepts. 

 

What will be done with my students

The student activities will vary at each grade level, however we are hoping to purchase materials for each 2nd-5th grade classroom to have 1 set per 2 students (allowing students to work in partnerships.)
The anglegs allow students to use the "legs" to create almost any shape. They can build shapes with equal sides, unequal sides, right angles, obtuse angles, acute angles, 4 sides, 5 sides, even 10 sided shapes!
Second Grade: Students will create geometric shapes including; triangles, squares, rectangles and hexagons. They will be able to identify the number of ANGLES, sides and vertices. They will then draw the shapes based on the attributes.
Third Grade: Students will create quadrilaterals including rectangles, squares, parallelograms, trapezoids, etc. They will identify right ANGLES, ANGLES less than 90 degrees and ANGLES greater than 90 degrees. Students will easily compare and contrast quadrilaterals such as a rectangle and parallelogram simply by tilting the shape.
Fourth Grade: Students will create a range of geometric shapes. They will be able to identify the type of ANGLE and measure the ANGLE using a protractor.
Fifth Grade: Students will create shapes based on specific attributes (make a quadrilateral with 4 right angles and 4 equal sides.) Students will not only compare quadrilaterals, but ALL 2-dimensional shapes. In the past students would attempt to draw the shape, only for it to inaccurately depict the shape. Anglegs allow students to manipulate the angles to recreate a new shape with similar attributes.  

 

Benefits to my students

Allowing students to physically build their own shapes will not only increase the level of engagement for all students but also deepen their understanding of key concepts and content vocabulary. Understanding key vocabulary is, arguably, one of the biggest challenges in teaching geometry to elementary students. Students have an opportunity to create shapes but also, just as important, have meaningful conversations about what they are doing. Imagine a classroom full students creating, discussing and writing about their learning. The Anglegs throw out the paper-pencil-worksheet-math way of teaching and get kids learning through DOING! 

 

Describe the Students

Our 2nd-5th graders consist of 400 students.
6 students have been retained in 3rd grade
7 students have autism
18 students are ESOL
23 students are ESE
60 students are Gifted
116 students identified as low performers in Math
224 boys
176 girls 

 

Budget Narrative

Angleg kit unit price 3.99
3.99 X 165 kits= 658.35 

 

Items

# Item Cost
1 165 Angleg kits $658.35
  Total: $658.35

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